socialEvents

Back to All Events

Scott Clark (solo) | Jeremiah Cymerman (solo) | Jeb Bishio & Dan Ruccia

For the past fifteen years, composer/performer Jeremiah Cymerman (pronounced SIMMER-man) has become an increasingly integral part of the New York Downtown scene, charting a colorful career as a clarinetist, improviser, sound artist, recording engineer, archivist and podcaster. Frequently using the recording studio as a primary compositional tool, Cymerman’s work reflects a passionate interest in improvisation, electronic manipulation & production, traditional, studio & graphic composition as well as solo clarinet and ensemble performance practices. As a composer, he has received commissions from the Jerome Foundation and Roulette Intermedium. As a performer, he has worked closely with many of contemporary music’s most important artists, including John Zorn, Toby Driver, Mario Diaz de Leon, Brian Chase, Christopher Hoffman, Evan Parker, Nate Wooley, Joshua Rubin, Anthony Coleman, Matthew Welch and others.

Trombonist Jeb Bishop and violist Dan Ruccia begin a five city tour of the East Coast in support of their new album Scratch Slice Jag (Out & Gone Music) on June 26. Bishop and Ruccia will bring their brand of adventurous and rigorous free improvisation to audiences from Washington DC to South Carolina. For all but one performance Bishop and Ruccia will be joined by a series of special guests, making each night a unique and unforgettable experience.

Drummer and composer, Scott Clark keeps time in the balance. His performances behind the kit are generous and empathetic, establishing his voice immediately upon striking the surface. It is rare to find art that is both formally rigorous and aesthetically vital, but Clark thrives in this project, engineering frameworks for lucid, active songs, drawing on the performances of his collaborators and the weight of his subject matter. A series of jazz suites have emerged from the study of his own Native ancestry, beginning with ury My Heart (2016) written in response to Dee Brown’s book of the same title, and continuing with oNo (2018) written as a contribution to the Standing Rock protests and the unlawful construction of an oil pipeline across Native land. By centering jazz in this historic and ongoing injustice, Clark pulls together a deeply American artform and a deeply American tragedy, yet his project never feels weighed down by its sense of purpose. Protest music that is lucid and nourishing, a rhythmic shape of restless assurance.